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  • Vi har fået en ny vin på kortet i Tårnet, men det er ikke en helt almindelig vin. Den er fra Sydafrika og vinmagerne, DeMorgenzon, spiller barokmusik for deres vinstokke.  De sendte os dette brev, der giver en lille forklaring på deres glimrende og musikalske vine:

    Dear Tårnet

    Thanks so much for the listing of our wines on your wine list.

    We at DeMorgenzon believe that music can influence the growth of a vine and the fruit it bears. We have played Baroque, and early Classical, music to our growing vines in the vineyard, in the winery and in the cellar all day, and every day, for the past five years.

    In 1973, in “The Secret Life of Plants,” Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird claimed that plants were sentient beings that feel emotions, prefer classical music to rock and roll, and can respond to the unspoken thoughts of humans hundreds of miles away […].

    Okay, if we accept that plants may have some sort of ‘intelligence,’ why do we play Baroque music to them? Well, it’s the wave that counts. The vibration made, rather than the beautiful music heard.

    Why, then, Baroque Music? The Age of Enlightenment (or Age of Reason) was era from the 1650s to the 1780s in which cultural and intellectual forces in Western Europe emphasized reason, analysis, and individualism rather than traditional lines of authority. […]
    Bach was the greatest of the Baroque (if not of all) composers. He made use of a number of formal mathematical patterns when he composed his majestic organ fugues. He used, for example, the “golden section” as well as the Fibonacci succession (1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13 etc., in which each number in the succession is the sum of the two previous ones). In many ways he worked like an architect, joining the two different parts of a musical piece into one harmonious whole before the actual process of composition started.

    What have we seen over the past five years? The music seems to cause the vines to bud and grow more evenly, and ripen more slowly. Whilst the objective of this note is not to extol the (many) virtues of our wines, we experience phenolic ripeness with lower sugar levels which results in wines with all the ripeness, fruit, and acidity one would want, but with slightly lower alcohol levels.

    In conclusion, Shakespeare sums it all up perfectly: “There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”

    All the best,

    Wendy

11. november 2015

Vinen hører barokmusik

Vi har fået en ny vin på kortet i Tårnet, men det er ikke en helt almindelig vin. Den er fra Sydafrika og vinmagerne, DeMorgenzon, spiller barokmusik for deres vinstokke.  De sendte os dette brev, der giver en lille forklaring på deres glimrende og musikalske vine:

Dear Tårnet

Thanks so much for the listing of our wines on your wine list.

We at DeMorgenzon believe that music can influence the growth of a vine and the fruit it bears. We have played Baroque, and early Classical, music to our growing vines in the vineyard, in the winery and in the cellar all day, and every day, for the past five years.

In 1973, in “The Secret Life of Plants,” Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird claimed that plants were sentient beings that feel emotions, prefer classical music to rock and roll, and can respond to the unspoken thoughts of humans hundreds of miles away […].

Okay, if we accept that plants may have some sort of ‘intelligence,’ why do we play Baroque music to them? Well, it’s the wave that counts. The vibration made, rather than the beautiful music heard.

Why, then, Baroque Music? The Age of Enlightenment (or Age of Reason) was era from the 1650s to the 1780s in which cultural and intellectual forces in Western Europe emphasized reason, analysis, and individualism rather than traditional lines of authority. […]
Bach was the greatest of the Baroque (if not of all) composers. He made use of a number of formal mathematical patterns when he composed his majestic organ fugues. He used, for example, the “golden section” as well as the Fibonacci succession (1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13 etc., in which each number in the succession is the sum of the two previous ones). In many ways he worked like an architect, joining the two different parts of a musical piece into one harmonious whole before the actual process of composition started.

What have we seen over the past five years? The music seems to cause the vines to bud and grow more evenly, and ripen more slowly. Whilst the objective of this note is not to extol the (many) virtues of our wines, we experience phenolic ripeness with lower sugar levels which results in wines with all the ripeness, fruit, and acidity one would want, but with slightly lower alcohol levels.

In conclusion, Shakespeare sums it all up perfectly: “There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”

All the best,

Wendy



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